CEEX - M1-4044 MANAGEMENT - THE SECURITY OF SYSTEMS, MILITARY
AND  CIVIL-MILITARY ACTIONS WITHIN MANAGING CRISIS AND ARMED CONFLICTS

About the Project

 

On national level, the concerns related with identifying, analyzing, synthesizing, knowing and turning into profitable the state and dynamic indicators have been sporadic and empirical. Generally speaking, the causes generating crisis and armed conflicts are not analysed taking into consideration their complexity and determinations, but only considering the past or present effects. These causes are not always sizeable, they have non-linear, even chaotic developments and they need an ample, both analytical and synthetic scientific approach. It is used a system of state and dynamic indicators that may enable the timely study of the conditions’ variations, the circumstances and factors generating crisis and conflicts, the predictable insecure effect. The military and civil-military systems’ security, used in theatres of operations or in other circumstances, are limited to what is called ensuring the displays and actions. Generally speaking, they are meant to avoid the strategic and tactic surprise and to maintain the force’s operational capacity. So far, a reaction, passive security has been achieved. An active, preventive security is needed, having self-adapting mechanisms and systems to the situation’s concrete conditions, to the vulnerabilities’, dangers’, threats’ and risks’ dynamics, both assumed or imposed.

The Network Centric Warfare, the unprecedented dynamic of crisis and armed conflicts, terrorist actions, require a new approach of danger, threat, ways for securing systems and actions, both intrinsically and extrinsically. The Network Centric Warfare, as other actions used for managing crisis and conflicts, is more and more considered as business parameters, in terms of efficiency and inefficiency. That is why the patterns used in economical analysis and evaluations are very useful in analysing and understanding crisis, armed conflicts and wars.

 

These patterns, and others, from different other fields – economical, social, political, military and even cultural – urge on a theoretical and pragmatic approach, a larger one, that should generate a new paradigm of securing military systems and actions within managing crisis and armed conflicts by the beginning of the millennium.